​​Using Mindfulness to Increase the Flexibility of Your Mind

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You may think of mindfulness meditation as a way of de-stressing or getting in touch with a more spiritual side of yourself.

 . . . we’ve found that those who participated in mindful meditation practice were roughly 69% more likely to show improvements in executive functioning.

-Lifespark

Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to these potential benefits, practicing mindfulness may be able to help you reach new heights of mental flexibility.Meditation

In our own research with older adults, we’ve found that those who participated in mindful meditation practice (e.g., paying close attention to their own experience without judgement) were roughly 69% more likely to show improvements in executive functioning (i.e., a broad set of thinking abilities including mental flexibility) beyond the average participant in a basic relaxation group that was used for comparison purposes.

Other research has similarly found a link between meditation practice and cognitive abilities, including mental flexibility, bolstering the evidence supporting the use of meditation as a brain-sharpening tool.

As a beginner it can be hard to know how to start practicing mindfulness meditation. In my experience, I’ve found that it is helpful to start out with some structure (e.g., by listening to a guided script) and build up to longer meditations (e.g., maybe start with just five minutes a day).

 
Please share your mindfulness practice and favorite meditation tips with the Lifespark Community below in the Comments box. We want to hear from you!
 

EXCLUSIVE: Mindfulness Meditation Guide

Get your FREE Mindfulness Meditation Audio Guide by joining the Lifespark Community. Enjoy both video and audio-only formats. 

 


Introduction To Thinking Flexibly

 

 

 

 

 

Further Reading:

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

  
 
 

 

 

 

 


Sources:

Chiesa, A., Calati, R., & Serretti, A. (2011). Does mindfulness training improve cognitive abilities? A systematic review of neuropsychological findings. Clinical Psychology Review, 31, 449-464.
 

 

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